CofC in the News: Week of June 18, 2018

College of Charleston “In the News” is a round-up of news articles featuring College faculty, staff, students and alumni. Recent media coverage of CofC includes: 

School’s out for summer — and that’s bad news for literacy and math

Rachael James of the College’s After School and Summer Learning Resource Center talks to The Post and Courier about summer brain drain.

‘It’s like emotional torture’: The day Mark Sanford lost it all

The Post and Courier interviews political science professor Jordan Ragusa about Mark Sanford’s loss in the congressional primary.

Why the South Still Matters in the Minds of Its People

Political science professor Gibbs Knotts talks about Southern identify with South Carolina Public Radio.

Life rich on never-seen deep ocean bottom off South Carolina

The Post and Courier writes a story about CofC students helping in an underwater exploration.

Charleston floodwaters are crawling with unsafe levels of poop bacteria

Geology professor Vijay Vulava is interviewed by The Post and Courier concerning a story about storm water quality.

Political science professor Gibbs Knotts is interviewed by NPR, The Hill, Associated Press, WCIV-TV , The City Paper and The State about primary elections.

Political Science professor Jordan Ragusa is interviewed by The Hill, The City Paper, and The Post and Courier about primary elections.

Political science professor Karyn Amira is interviewed by WCBD-TV about a congressional election.

College of Charleston alumni would like a woman president, please

The Post and Courier has a story about the CofC presidential search.

Survey: More Charleston businesses are looking to hire, despite record-low unemployment

Economist Frank Hefner is quoted in The Post and Courier in a story about the economy.

U.S. States Scramble to Take Your Sports Bets

Economist Doug Walker talks to the website How Stuff Works about betting.

The Problem with “Learning Styles”

Psychology professor Cindi May writes about learning for Scientific American.