Educational Conference TLTCon Free to Faculty, Staff

Educational Conference TLTCon Free to Faculty, Staff

Maybe you want to learn how to get grant funding, how to build a sense of community in large introductory classes or improve student group work. Maybe you’re curious about online education, Microsoft Teams, augmented reality or the best practices for ethics and data security in digital research. Maybe you just want some fresh ideas from educators like yourself.

Believe it or not, you can get all that and more in one place – and it’s free!

The College of Charleston’s Teaching and Learning Team (TLT) invites all faculty and staff to attend the 2019 Teaching, Learning and Technology Conference (TLTCon), May 16 and 17, in the Robert Scott Small Building, 175 Calhoun Street. Doors open at 8 a.m. for onsite registration, with sessions running from 9 a.m. to 3:45 on Thursday and 9 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. on Friday.

Supporting educators in all fields, this free conference is designed to bring together expertise from educational institutions across the region, spotlight teaching excellence and provide a space for idea sharing and networking. By bringing together educators and leaders in the field of pedagogy to share ideas, techniques, best practices and lesson learned, TLTCon allows educators to learn from one another, creating an opportunity for greater campus discussion and collaboration about pedagogy and instructional technologies.

Delivered in a conference-style format, TLTCon allows participants to choose sessions that are relevant to their own professional development. Sessions – many of which will be led by College of Charleston faculty and staff – include panel presentations, spotlight sessions and workshops. There will also be spaces where participants can continue the conversation with colleagues and reflect on their own teaching practices.

A full schedule of sessions/events, including session descriptions, is available here.

The 2019 keynote speaker is Henry Roediger III of Washington University, whose research is concerned with retrieval processes in human memory and how knowledge is recovered. He will discuss the book he co-authored, Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning; his philosophy on different learning styles and strategies for fostering and encouraging successful learning. He will also deliver a talk about the varieties of superior memory.

Faculty and staff may register for free here. For more information, contact the TLT.