CofC In The News: Week of Aug. 26, 2019

College of Charleston “In the News” is a weekly round-up of news articles featuring College faculty, staff, students or alumni. Recent media coverage of the College includes:

The State, The Post and Courier, City Paper, WCSC-TV, and WOLO-TV preview Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke’s visit to the College of Charleston.

WCIV-TV and Charleston CEO look at the College’s new safety app.

WCIV-TV and WCSC-TV report on the retirement of CofC police Chief Robert S. Reese.

Charleston CEO and WCIV-TV look at a new systems engineering program at the College.

PJ MediaCity PaperDemocratic Underground and Courthouse News Service look at a recent trip by Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg to the College.

Edward Hart named new composer-in-residence for Charleston Symphony

The Charleston City Paper writes about music professor Edward Hart being named the new composer-in-residence for the Charleston Symphony Orchestra.

Recession Talk on this Money Monday

WTAT-TV talks to economics professor Frank Hefner about the economy.

College of Charleston coming to terms with its role in slavery. A documentary is one step.

The Post and Courier reports on the College’s effort to reveal more of its history and acknowledge the contributions of enslaved Africans.

When it comes to great arts towns, Charleston doesn’t make Top 10. Here’s how to fix that

 Arts management professor Chris Burgess talks to The Post and Courier about the arts scene in Charleston.

SCDOT chemical sprays leave corridors of dead plants around Edisto and Charleston area

The Post and Courier interviews geology professor Vijay Vulava about various chemicals and their impact on the environment.

The Origins of White Supremacists’ Fear of Replacement

History professor Adam Domby talks to Hyperallergic about white supremacy.   

Trump, ‘King of Israel,’ Makes U.S. Jews Not Only Traitors, but Apostates, Too

Jewish Studies professor Joshua Shanes is quoted in an op-ed in Haaretz.

Charleston plantation guides say a negative reaction to stirring history can be a good thing 

African American history professor Shannon Eaves and history professor Adam Domby talk to the City Paper about history and southern plantations.