The Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) is offering a four-part series on faculty wellness and wellbeing. College of Charleston faculty and staff alike are invited to attend the CETL Fall 2021 Wellness and Wellbeing Series, which will be led by CofC faculty. ​​​​​​​Participants will learn about cultivating wellness and wellbeing of body, mind and heart, focusing on personal connections to life and identity within academia.

The sessions are capped, so faculty and staff are asked to register ahead of time. See below for information about each session, as well as the registration links.

Session #1: Viva Las Vagus: Physiology of Wellness and Wellbeing
Thursday, Oct. 7, 12:30–1:30 p.m.
Addlestone Library, Room 127
Register Here.

Does your work bring stress into your everyday life? Do you ever have trouble falling asleep at night? Led by Margaret Hagood, CETL director professor of teacher education, this professional development session will provide an overview of the body as it learns, helping participants to become less nervous, more spatially conscious and calmer by learning to attune to the vagus nerve.

Session #2: Few Things Are Panaceas, but Mindfulness Is!
Wednesday, Oct. 27, 10–11 p.m.
Addlestone Library, Room 227
Register Here.

Led by Rhonda Swickert-Hittner, psychology professor, this session will teach participants how mindfulness can reduce stress, enhance performance and facilitate wellbeing.

Session #3: Leveraging Your Brain’s Plasticity to Improve Your Wellness
Monday, Nov. 15, 12–1 p.m.
Addlestone Library, Room 227
Register Here.

Participants will learn to leverage their brain’s plasticity to enhance their overall wellness in this session, led by Anne Gutshall, chair of the teacher education department.

Session #4: Boundary Setting and Balance: Reclaiming Your Time Through Planning, Goal Setting and the Power of ‘No’
Tuesday, Dec. 7, 10–11 a.m.
Addlestone Library, Room 227
Register Here. 

We often hear about “work-life balance,” but what does that mean? Would we approach our professional and personal commitments differently if we thought more about wholeness, showing up, pleasure, joy and transparency? Led by Tamara Butler, director of the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture, participants in this session will think about the promises and limits of work-life balance.